Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Hinder Not the Little Ones......

Tom: 'We're Just Scientologists'
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Well what can you expect from Non-Christians? I would hope that Mr. and Mrs. Holmes will step in along with every priest from her home parish and remind Katie that the soul of the child is a stake!!!

Of course, fundamentalists will argue that who cares? It's just a baby. You have to be an adult to be "born again." First and foremost, in the Gospel of Mark 10:14-15 we read "Let the children come to me; do not prevent them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. Amen, I say to you, whoever does not accept the kingdom of God like a child 2 will not enter it." In John 14:15, 21 "If you love me, you will keep my commandments. Whoever has my commandments and observes them is the one who loves me. And whoever loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and reveal myself to him."

Now we also read about Lydia and how "She was baptized, with her household" (Acts 16:15), the Phillipian Jailer whom Paul and Silas had converted to the faith was baptized that night along with his household. We are told that "the same hour of the night . . . he was baptized, with all his family" (Acts 16:33). And in his greetings to the Corinthians, Paul recalled that, "I did baptize also the household of Stephanas" (1 Cor. 1:16).

No where does it say in Scripture that the Husband and Wife only were baptized. NO! The ENTIRE household was baptized - moms, dads, slaves, servants, children of all ages - EVERYONE in the household was baptized. As babies, all the Jews were circumcized as part of the covenant with God. Why would God now NOT want the babies to be within his covenant? It doesn't make sense.

As Catholics who do not hold strictly to Sola Scriptura as Protestants do, we can also look to what the Church Fathers wrote about. Origen, for instance, wrote in the third century that "according to the usage of the Church, baptism is given even to infants" (Holilies on Leviticus, 8:3:11 [A.D. 244]). The Council of Carthage, in 253, condemned the opinion that baptism should be withheld from infants until the eighth day after birth. Later, Augustine taught, "The custom of Mother Church in baptizing infants is certainly not to be scorned . . . nor is it to be believed that its tradition is anything except apostolic" (Literal Interpretation of Genesis 10:23:39 [A.D. 408]).

None of the Church fathers were outraged at infant baptism - they PROMOTED it!!! The Bible NEVER says "Faith in Christ is necessary for salvation except for infants"; it simply says, "Faith in Christ is necessary for salvation."

So, to put it plainly: the Catholic Church is merely continuing the tradition established by the first Christians, who heeded the words of Christ: "Let the children come to me, and do not hinder them; for to such belongs the kingdom of God" (Luke 18:16).

Blessings!

3 comments:

SC GirlyGrl said...[Reply]

You have guessed correctly my friend. Peace be with you!

Gigs said...[Reply]

Hi. Just wanted to introduce myself as one of Anastasia's friends and found your blog via hers.

I've pretty much been protestant all my life and up til now have never known there was a latin term for the "age of accountability" theology. Guess you learn something new every day.

I just thought I'd share some of my personal experience. I've recently been a member of a Presbyterian church here in Columbia and they 'sprinkle' their babies as a sign of bringing them into the covenant. And Baptists, which I grew up in, do what they call a dedication service, where the child is dedicated to the Lord and the parents, surrounding adult family, friends, and yes even fellow church members are held accountable for the "training in the way this child should go" until they reach the age of accountability and decide for themselves.

Just thought it would be an interesting fact to share.

God bless!

Jennifer said...[Reply]

Gigs,

Thanks for posting! I have been on your site several times, but not posted.

I was protestant all my life until 3 years ago. I was brought up Baptist (in a Baptist "conglomerate" where nothing is done until you are able to be accountable - mostly teenagers), Baptized Presbyterian (where infant Baptism is still performed), then found the true faith and converted in 2003.

I think you mean Sola Scriptura which basically means that Scripture is everything. Protestants believe it, Catholics don't. One of the MANY reasons why we say that Catholicism is the FULLNESS of Christ's Church.

Welcome to my blog. Hope to see more of you!
Blessings!

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